Six o’clock on a Sunday and the regular cloud rustles in.

Perched on the edge of a spur, with National Park surrounding you, Bunya Spires has a wonderful view down the valley and the early morning cloud rolling in. On Sunday March 25, the cloud did not lift until after 8.00 am as it kissed and caressed the mountain and the forest. Even when it is cloudy, it is still relaxing a Bunya Spires. Time is running out to book your Bunya Spires winter experience. To get more daily weathercam images visit http://www.bunyaspires.com.au/weather/ .

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WARNING – Falling bunya pine cones

Extract from the new website National Parks website – for mre information see – https://www.npsr.qld.gov.au/parks/bunya-mountains/ Bounty of the bunya nut From December to March, bunya pines drop cones containing edible seeds known as bunya nuts. Heavy crops normally occur about every three years. For countless generations, large groups of Aboriginal people gathered at the Bunya Mountains to take part in what today are known as the bunya festivals, coinciding with this natural event. Aboriginal people of the Bunya Mountains and Blackall Ranges (nearer the coast) invited people from as far south as the Clarence River in northern New South Wales, west to the Maranoa River, east to Wide Bay and north… Read More

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Bunya Bluegrass

Extract from ABC Wide Bay Queensland – February 2009 Botanist Caroline Haskard said the Bunya Mountain Bluegrass is found not only in the Bunyas but a few adjacent state forest areas in the Darling Downs and South Burnett – and nowhere else in the world. “Not many people would recognise it even if they stumbled across it,” Ms Haskard said, “They’d probably just think it was one of the other bluegrasses that graziers tend to like.” The Bunya Mountain Bluegrass is found only on ‘balds’ – open grassy areas in the middle of the rainforest. “It’s the only place in the world where grassland patches occur within rainforest. There’s nowhere… Read More

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